skip to Main Content

Children

Children are at the center of ESHA’s attention. As school leaders of Europe together we discuss in what way our changing society effects our children. The themes that we discuss, work on and exchange experiences on related to the wellbeing of children are: social behavior, crisis psychology, bullying and suicide prevention, radicalization, learners with special needs and early school leaving.

children

Social Behaviour

Effective strategies to combat bullying in schools

Current research and common sense tell us that schools need to be places that are physically, emotionally, and psychologically safe for students to learn to their fullest potential. Given these criteria, one would surmise that preventing bullying would be paramount on any principal’s list of priorities. Unfortunately, this is often not the case.

Safe internet

Although your children may have better technical skills than you, they still need your practical advice and support to understand the risks and make sensible and informed choices online. Whether on a computer at school, a laptop at home, a games console or mobile phone, children and young people are increasingly accessing the internet wherever they are. If your child understands the risks, they can get the most from the internet and stay safe whilst doing so
Read this brochure and know what kids are doing online

Educate Roma children

Mothers of Roma children in Italy are being trained to support their children in the classroom as part of an EU project to boost the number of Roma children attending school. It comes ahead of International Roma Day falling on April the 8th – which celebrates Roma culture and aims to raise awareness of the issues facing the largest minority in Europe.

Links:

No place for bullying

Read more about Roma children on this site

Interesting initiatives with regards to preventing and reducing bullying:  Childnet

Omar Mekki describes ways to deal with brats. The Brat by Omar Mekki

kids samen

Bullying and Suicide Prevention

Effective strategies to combat bullying in schools

Current research and common sense tell us that schools need to be places that are physically, emotionally, and psychologically safe for students to learn to their fullest potential. Given these criteria, one would surmise that preventing bullying would be paramount on any principal’s list of priorities. Unfortunately, this is often not the case.

James Dillon describes why every educator must prevent bullying in No place for bullying

The United Kingdom takes the lead with regards to preventing and reducing bullying. The country’s leading initiative Childnet describes how to deal with bullying.

The Beprox programme (Alsaker, 2004) is a Swiss intervention which uses teacher and parent education as the sole component of a universal programme to address bullying. It emphasises group discussions, mutual support and co-operation between consultants and teachers and between teachers and parents. The programme engages teachers in an intensive focused training about bullying and supervision for approximately four months. Teachers implement specific preventive elements in the classroom and then meet and discuss their experiences of the implementation: Bre-Prox Programme, Bernese Anti-bullying programme. Switzerland
Professor Dr Francoise Alsaker francoise.alsaker@psy.unibe.ch

The Norwegian anti- bullying programme (Galloway and Roland 2004) has at its core teacher education which gives teachers the opportunity to discuss the practical implications of the theoretical interventions they learned, which consists of four in-service days over a nine-month period, plus fifteen two-hour peer supervision sessions: Norwegian Anti-bullying programme, Norway
Professor David Galloway d.m.galloway@durham.ac.uk

Early School Leaving

Early leavers in education

Early school leaving is an urgent and serious problem, both for individuals and society as a whole. The EU Member States work together to reduce the number of pupils who drop out before the end of secondary education. There are many reasons – often highly individual – why some young people give up education and training prematurely: learning difficulties, social problems or a lack of motivation, guidance or support.

Please read more about early school leavers at our dedicated page: coming soon

Learners with special needs

Inclusion is becoming more of an issue within educational systems in all countries, it is symptomatic of the ambiguity which surrounds issues related to inclusion and exclusion that the words themselves have recently acquired new and restrictive meanings. “Inclusion” is sometimes used to mean the absorption of pupils currently educated in special schools into mainstream schooling: “exclusion” sometimes means the sanction formerly known as suspension or expulsion.

meisje

Crisis Psychology

This booklet will help you understand bereaved children and what can be done to help them. Beliefs about death and the rituals and customs surrounding it vary across cultures. As will be seen below, these customs play a very important part in children’s grieving, so the ways in which children are helped to grieve will differ depending on their cultural background. We have tried to set out basic principles for helping children below, but they have to be adapted to your culture and community.

Early Intervention

The term early intervention can broadly cover the provision of services to infants, toddlers and young children who are considered vulnerable for reasons of disability, the risk of disability, social disadvantage, child abuse, and other factors

Increasingly, in the U.S., Australia, England, Europe, and New Zealand, jurisdictions have moved towards a more inclusive approach to early intervention for children with special education needs, that acknowledges the importance of children with disabilities being included in mainstream early childhood and community settings. However, while teachers accept the principle of inclusion, they also recognise challenges in its implementation, including their lack of knowledge about children with disabilities and the need for training, skills and resources to help them to provide an appropriate programme.

Study of Mental Health and Schools-Mental Health screening of children in schools – The below files include an overview of available literature for some of the most interesting subjects in school interventions. The literature can be used for study purposes.

School intervention for addiction, click here

School intervention focused on improvement of learning and academic skills or focused on social integration in the classroom of children with psychiatric diagnosis, click here

Interventions on general well-being in schools, click here

en English
X
Back To Top