skip to Main Content

Leadership

The curriculum schools offer, the way that curriculum is taught and assessed needs to be constantly examined to ensure it remains fit for purpose to advance the values we want to promote as a society and to shape the vision we have for our society.    

Investing in School Leadership will be a key driver for innovation in schools. The quality of the teacher in the classroom is paramount and building the competences and capacities of our teachers to cope with changing methodologies, lifestyle and societal expectations will be equally important

leadership

School Leadership and Quality Management

The curriculum schools offer, the way that curriculum is taught and assessed needs to be constantly examined to ensure it remains fit for purpose to advance the values we want to promote as a society and to shape the vision we have for our society.

Investing in School Leadership will be a key driver for innovation in schools. The quality of the teacher in the classroom is paramount and building the competences and capacities of our teachers to cope with changing methodologies, lifestyle and societal expectations will be equally important. In most countries, the school head will have to enable change by making strategic decisions, setting strategic goals, involving teachers, parents and students, dealing with resistance to change, implementing people reviews, etc etc.

 

Links:

ESHA supports the Quality For Innovation (Q4I) project. The project aims to develop a generic quality management model for innovative schools.The following reports (which can be read here)  describe the autonomy trends in Europe and its consequences on school leadership:

Finnish quality management approach for small schools

European Education Policy by Ian Bauckham

Distributed Leadership

Leadership in education is knowing where you’re going. With which people, and what difficulties you can meet. But leadership is more than that. Leadership means listening to people. Inspire people. Take responsibility. Give responsibility. But above all you need to have a passion for learning.

Managing change

The adoption of innovations involves altering human behaviour and the acceptance of change. Managing this change professionally is one of the school leaders main tasks. The two main obstacles to a successful innovation are:

1. Maintaining high quality standards.
The Quality for Innovation project, which started in December 2012, aims to develop, test and mainstream a quality development approach for schools that includes a strong commitment to innovation. Q4I is a project designed to ensure high quality education while innovating educational practices. Using the innovative Q4I processes will lead to higher quality education and the ability to adapt to constant changes

2. Resistance to Change
The adoption of innovations involves altering human behaviour and the acceptance of change. There is a natural resistance to change for several reasons. People resist change when: the reason for the change is unclear, the proposed users have not been consulted, the change threatens to modify established working relationships, benefits and rewards for making the change are not seen as adequate. The Iguana project works on delivering a free of charge course to manage resistance to change.

Links:

ESHA’s Position Paper on Distributed Leadership

By sharing knowledge and responsibilities we can learn from each other.ESHA and ETUCE (European Teachers Association) have published a joint research into distributive leadership. Their publications can be found at the ESHA Community portal. Their publications describe how different kinds of distributive leadership has been adopted by school heads around Europe.

Distributed leadership.pdf

Educational leadership and democracy.pdf

esha foto 5

Reduced Budgets

Schools are facing significant budget cuts around Europe. In Scotland this has come at the same time as implementation of a new curriculum and as a result schools are seeing an increase in expectations while budgets fall. Head Teachers and their staff are constantly asked to do more with less and to take on new duties – more often than not their professionalism leads them to try to plug every funding gap with sweat from their own brow. This is not sustainable.

It is time for Headteachers to identify the things they can, or will, no longer do. This does not mean being resistant to change, it is about identifying the real priorities for your school and your pupils, communicating these to those around you and then only doing things which will contribute to the achievement of those priorities.”

Administrative Workload

“International studies show that the qualty of education depends on the quality of the teachers and school heads. Educating those who lead schools will enable positive change. But… how can a school leader be effective if she/he spends most of his time on administrative tasks?”

Back To Top